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20130124
20130201
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CSPAN 6
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English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
to worry about the debt ceiling, at what point do our creditors say, you know what? we're going to charge you a little more interest and that interest goes up to 6% on the $16 trillion? don't we just get to the same problem on a long-term approach by not dealing with the underlying -- >> congressman, i'm totally in favor of dealing with the budget. that's the point of the book we wrote called "white house burning," a dramatic enough title, i hope. >> okay. >> but the point is you need a balanced approach as was said at the beginning. >> mr. johnson, if i could -- it's my time. and i've heard the balanced approach now for a year and a half, and i heard it today from the panel. there's been $600 billion of additional revenue that is a result of the fiscal cliff negotiations. balanced approach to me was if you gave revenue, you got spending reforms. has the president offered any spending reforms as of yet in regards to that $600 billion of additional revenue? has anyone heard them? >> we're hoping to see some in the budget, sir. >> when he, when the president put -- when geithner put forth h
spending, a debt ceiling fight and a fiscal cliff fight. the president is talking about fox again. it's what happens when he gets into a fight. >> greta: it would be so much better if he would sort of man up and get in the arena instead of sits on the side line and talks to his comfortable media. pan it's so easy for him to take a shot and come here and be treated with respect and you know he will be here and bill o'reilly will probably treat him respectfully. he'll probably never talk to sean, but sean will be respectful and he won't come here. >> and research has shown that more democrats watch fox than republicans watch some of the other news networks and if you go back to the debt ceiling fight. one. things that angered the white house was republicans were saying repeatedly, the president hasn't put forth a plan. what is his plan to cut spending and the answer was, well, you're just spouting fox talking points and that's when you get mad. when you ask them for some substantive commitment on issues what you've seen in the last few weeks. >> we call members of the democratic party e
out fox. summer of 2011, big fight over the debt ceiling at the time. jay carney, white house press secretary accuses ed henry, our white house correspondent of spouting republican talking points. and now, to get into this fight over more and more spending. we have had a debt ceiling fight and a fiscal cliff fight, the president's talking about fox again. >> it would be so much better if he would man up and get in the arena. instead, he sits on the sidelines and talks to the comfortable media -- i don't blame him. but it's easy to take a shot. but he can come here. r. he will be treated with respect. bill o'reilly -- he would never talk to sean. but sean would be respectful am but he doesn't, you know, he won't come here -- and -- >> the research has shown more democrats watch fox than republicans watch some of the other news networks. if you go back to the debt ceiling fight, one of the things that angered the white house was republicans were saying, repeatedly, the president hasn't put forth a plan. wais his plan to cut spending? the answer was, you are just spouting fox talking p
ceiling unless the senate passes a budget. we are going to point the country in the right direction. we are going to cut spending. [applause] it will be times when conservatives disagree on the way forward. we have never marched in lockstep. that is not what we do. and healthy debate is a good and needed thing. we can do that in private without doing it in public. we need to give an honest account of our actions and the reasons for that. we should challenge the left and not each other. our founders were men of prudence. take james madison. nowadays they call him the founder of the constitution. he lost some key governments -- arguments. he fought for plan to give the states the same number of states in the government. he wanted to give congress even more power. he wanted it to be able to veto state laws. madison argued vigorously for his side. when it came time to ratify the constitution, there was no greater advocate and james madison. he helped write editorials and called it the federalist papers. he led the charge for approval at the virginia state convention. he paid a price for his
it kicking the can down the road but i call it them surrendering. >> here is the point. delaying the debt ceiling, which i said they need to do to -- what are they buying with the few months? not bad forcing the senate to address the budget but what they are not doing, we are not having a national discussion of the medicare numbers we were talking about. we are not having a diagnostic consensus in this country. that, my god, we are going broke which gets you -- they do not go --. >> and i say one thing? the word was used "transformational" and doug said he wants to transform into more of a liberal president. where he ought to be, and we are political insiders association i would give him this political advise, he wanted to be a ronald reagan. he wanted to a transformational president. just as only nixon could go to china, only an african-american re-elected democratic president we can be the guy to take the entitlements and fix them for the long term but he doesn't want to. >> he wants to expand them and transform america. >> they will be bankrupt. >> johnson and fdr got circumstances per
the road. and the tax hikes were not as bad as many people thought. the next thing is the debt ceiling which was a big leverage point and republicans kicked that can down the road. all you have left is the sequester. a lot of votes stores are on the sidelines worried about political risk and but a lot of political risk has been removed. tracy: you said kicked down the road but it will come back. you're talking about short-term euphoria for a while, correct? >> correct. the fed money policy is a huge driver. they're in the process of a financial repression regime where you look at different asset classes like treasury bonds. they're incredibly expensive. you don't make anything after cash. you lose money after inflation, right? tracy: right. >> what are your options? they're trying to drive people into risk assets. as investors look into high-yield bond or certain types of mortgage-backed securities they have become very rich. the only thing really left is equities. it is almost a process of elimination for investors. they end up driving equities higher. tracy: that's what we've seen in
. >> i don't think those demands are going away. part of the point of the short-term debt ceiling extension just passed last week was sort of to try and leverage their position in the sequester-related discussion of $1.2 trillion of autoic spending cuts set to kick in on march 1st which are delayed two months with the fiscal cliff deal. they're hoping to extract spending cuts from president obama. if not that fight, then in the next debt ceiling fight the next debt ceiling fight. the demand nor spending cuts isn't going to go anywhere. >> bill: barney frank, he would be fired up, ready to go. he knows she is issues. he knows the fiscal issues better than anybody else. >> deval patrick said he would be happy to have him. he didn't endorse it per se but he expressed sort of opens to the idea. >> wouldn't be a big learning curve for barney. >> bill: no, not at all. i think it would be very tough for governor patrick not to appoint him. i mean who else could step in and have all of the information and all of the experience you need to really fight for the people. >> i was going to say
to raise taxes. two major points are coming up. the continuing resolution and the debt ceiling -- both of those are coming up in the next couple of months. those are leverage points that are the mirror image of the fiscal cliff. those are leverage points that if nothing passes the result is not a default on the debt. that is scaremongering by the president. the result is a temporary partial government shutdown, and we have seen that movie before, 1995, when republicans stood together and the result was some political pain, to be sure, but it was also year after year of balanced budgets, some of the most fiscally as possible policies we have seen -- it's possible policies we have seen in modern times. [applause] the only hope of getting anything affirmative done is going to come from those leverage points he cuts president obama has indicated, sadly, he has no interest in being bill clinton, tacking to the middle, compromising with anybody. the only way we are going to restrain the out-of-control spending and that that is threatening our future is to use the leverage points to force rea
think it will pass. and it give, i think, some certainty on this specific question of the debt ceiling and the question of default, because we know from 2011, the adverse impact 2,000 points in the -- that the dow lost. we know the consumer confidence took a six-month hit because of the debt ceiling fight. so, to take that off the table as a big washington fight helps a lot, i think. >> certainly, the markets, a lot of people pointing to one reason, you have had a pretty nice string of gains here that debate, at least the deadline pushed back a bit. where does the conversation now begin when it comes to real reform? who instigate it is and how constructive do you think it's going to be? >> i think we can build upon some of the previous efforts. we had an agreement in 2011 which allowed us to reduce spending and we can do that again. at the end to of this year so the called fiscal cliff deal i think was further evidence when you get 89 united states senators voting for that end of the year agree respect, the deal was perfect and had all kinds of frustrations associated with it, but we h
're going to do this at point a, point b, laterfore point c and the same thing with the debt ceiling. everything we do is temporary and this is especially with the gridlock between the republicans with a majority in the house and democrats in the senate. this doesn't, you know, excuse the president from sitting down and talking about the issues, but i don't feel that he's said, okay, these issues don't matter and i don't think they've been on the back burner, i think everyone is very clear with where the president stands as to what his ideas and the democratic philosophy is with regard to job creation, and what we need to do with the economy. the republicans are clear. congress needs to sit down and work this out. the president's not their baby sitter, not running a day care center and the american people need to make our congressional electorates and our senators that are elected, we need to make it known what we want. those are our priorities and by the way, heidi, yesterday, california lowest foreclosure rate in the month of january in years. and that's a step in the right directi
the of current debt ceiling through mid-may. but at that point it retroactively goes up and the bipartisan policy center says the increase will be $450 billion. call it about half a trillion so the new total will end up being around 17 trillion in federal debt, as of mid-may. that string attached to the no budget-no pay provision. house republicans who have passed budgets during the first obama term inserted this into the legislation, essentially to pressure senate democrats to pass budgets. they have not done that during obama's first term. the measure says each chamber has to pass a budget by mid-april. sured either chamber fail, its member's pay would be withheld. here is harry reid talking about it and how it comes together today. >> obviously democrats would prefer a longer suspension of the debt ceiling which would provide additional economic security and stability as we continue to find ways to decrease the deficit. raising the possibility the united states could default on its obligations every few months is not an ideal way to run government but a short-term solution is better than anoth
the only problem with the suspend the debt ceiling and make it go away, is a three-month part, suspend it. but the no pay, is getting misreported. i imagine this is part of the 27th amendment you point out, it is not no budget, no pay. if they don't pass a budget they don't get paid until the final day of the session. it is no budget, you get paid later. but you get all of your money kept in an escrow account, all handed to you on the last day of the session. it is not the same as no budget, no pay. just one more thing about the bill that is not quite on the level. >> and it is not actually a budget they're talking about. all they're talking about is each body talking about passing a resolution, which is not a law, and doesn't change anything. it is just a resolution, a promise to do something in the future. and the way they have written it, apparently ezra, if the senate passes one, then okay, the senate can get paid. if the house passes one then house members can get paid. but the 27th amendment very simply says no law varying the compensation of the services of senators and representat
, debt ceiling. on the other hand, despite all of that liquidity, we have mediocre employment growth, manufacturing data, while it has improved is still around that recessionary line of 50 and to your point around m2 that's very interesting and yet we're still at record low velocity of money. that's very scary. all this money pumped into the system is sitting on the balance sheets of banks, corporations. >> nominal gdp is starting to rise. >> slowly. >> what about the information revolution? now, you made an important point. so far why should raise taxes on investors, terrible idea. i'm hoping do no harm, maybe some small spending cuts so that's not going to be a factor. i don't see a debt default. i think that's off the table. what blt american energy revolution, what about the growth, what about the cheap natural gas and what about how that makes america so competitive? i'm only talking 2.5% growth, not 3%, 4, 5% growth. >> the fertilizer trusts are on fires. ammonia is going to be cheap, that's terrific. but here's a factoid for you. kmn's exports to asia are up 20% year on year.
turning point for this president was that debt debate over the debt ceiling in july and august of 2011 and there an opportunity there and it came close, and i will not ascribe blame because there is probably enough going around when it looked like the president and john boehner were able to make a grand bargain, 3, $4 trillion in deficit reduction, it fell apart and rightly or wrongly it seems clear that the president and the white house decided at that point, we can't do business with these guys. boehner can't control the tea party element in his own house. and we're going to have to start running for president and running for president, pushing a liberal agenda. really from mid-summer, boehner says from labor day of 2011, he was very much running for president, pushing the liberal agenda. he was the protector of the middle class. and it is continued up through his re-election and now we see it in his inaugural address, very little talk about common ground. you know he basically dismissed his republican opposition as absolutism, as name-calling. i think you will see a very aggressive,
with the debt ceiling, august 20 11, our economy produced the lowest job growth in three years. during that two-month period, the dow jones plummeted 2,000 points including one of its worst single day drops in history, 635 points on, on august 8. s&p downgrade the u.s. credit rating for the first time in history. leading republicans in june, 2011, criticized the notion of a short-term debt ceiling increase as providing a lack of certainty. the majority leader said, i quote, we feel very strongly that one of the reasons we continue to see an ailing economy is that people have very little confidence, have very little senchity in terms of where we are headed, end of quote. and our ways and means chairman echoed that feeng only days later, saying aut the prospect of a short-term debt ceiling increase, in quote, it does not give you certainty. this bill does not give certainty but uncertainty. the action we took new year's day to avoid the fiscal cliff brought our total deficit reduction over the past two years to $2.5 trillion. what's more, it set the stage for future further balanced agreements th
the difference here is unlike the debt ceiling which has the huge, global third party implications whether the government refinances itself, this is an invention of congress. they've decided please, tie my hands so i don't do it again. i do think therefore there's flexibility in whether they defer it or somehow play it some other way. >> bill: michael our guest finance writer for yahoo. all of this revolves, of course around the debt and the deficit. isn't it also true that we've made significant paydowns of the debt now and that's not -- so big, right but not as serious a problem as it was a year ago. >> this i think is kind of the under tone. it is not being talked about loudly. i do think it is the context for a lot of decisions. no debt has gotten paid down. we're running annual deficits. the absolute size of the government's debt gets bigger but the size of the deaf -- deficits have gone to under a trillion a year this year which no changes no effort really to actually do anything except for the economy to improve tax receipts to go up and you know, lower spending on sort of income su
. >> greta: every time we hit one of the mile posts, whether it's sequestration or debt ceiling, taxes going up, whatever it is, what happens is the solution is just to extend is somehow and create another hurdle in a certain period of time and when we get to that point we do it again. i mean. >> that's not the best way to do it. >> greta: is there ever going to be a finality to this. >> one way or the other because there will come a point where the debt will deal with us if we don't deal with it. no doubt it has to be dealt with, we would hope we would deal with it it before that point of crisis before we become europe or one of the places that scramble to deal with it that should been dealt with a long time. the president of the united states gave his inaugural address on monday and barely mentioned the national debt and the fundamental argument only way for the middle class and create prosperity in america is for the government to have more control over our economy, more taxes, more regulations, more spending. there's a fundamental difference between the president's view of our future and
. that has to change. [applause] now, the house won't consider another debt ceiling increase unless the senate passes a budget. and we're not going to just keep raising the debt ceiling. we're going to make a down payment on debt reduction, and we're going to point the country in the right direction, we're going to cut spending. [applause] you know, there will be times p when conservatives disagree on the way forward. we've never marched in lockstep. that's not what we do. a healthy debate is a good and needed thing. we can deliberate in private without fighting in public. all we should ask of each other is that we give an honest account of our actions and their reasons for them. we should challenge the left, not each other. and if we take the prudent course, you know what? we'll be in really good company. our founders were men of prudence. take james madison. nowadays we call him the founder, the father of the constitution. but at the constitutional convention, he lost some key arguments. you know, he fought the plan to give each state the same number of seats in the senate. he tho
to go along with the debt ceiling change, they had to promise that paul ryan was going to produce a budget in a week that would balance the budget in ten years with no revenue increases. >> right. >> now, when you see what is going to happen to spending in order to meet those numbers, i'd like to see her go out there and say, this is the kind of thing the republican party should get behind and run behind because it's going to be ugly. >> richard wolffe, mary matalin is positive. there aren't a lot of republicans right now who are given what's happened. but again, we see shifts in party allegiances fairly quickly. it just does seem like my party is suffering a long-term letdown. to say the least. >> yeah. look, mary has a strong character, as we all know. the truth is that the president actually won and he won pretty big for his ideas. i didn't -- by the way, the president talking about cap and trade in his inaugural. he didn't say how he would address climate change. he said we have to address the impact of it. the question for republicans, i think, is what's the big idea? and it
they knew they were in trouble on the debt ceiling, and then put the pressure on somebody else, namely the senate. but they are going to put forth a budget pretty soon that is really going to be an important % contrast for the american people to see. they are going to try to balance the budget in ten years, which you cannot do without slashing medicare and medicaid, and social security. so the american people will get, i think, a very good look at the way republicans want to balance the budget and do deficit reduction and the way democrats do. we actually went through this with paul ryan's budget which was so egregious the leader of his party had to back away from it in the campaign. >> stephanie: yeah, it was seen as sort of a slap at the senate but they are calling it the no budget, no pay idea. it has been regarded by a lot of people as a gimmick. here they go. it's a new way to play some sort of partisan games right? >> exactly. and it doesn't guarantee that there will be a compromised budget agreement between the house and senate. they can pass one, just as the
backed off that so you didn't get that outcome. at the same time, they've pushed off the debt ceiling for a few months. so the body language out of washington has been more constellatory. so when you get to this point where you think about what the deficit might look like this year, i don't think you're going to be looking at a balanced budget so soon. you can't sustain trillion dollar deficiter year after year after year doubling the debt so many years and still think that the market is going to accept that over time. they know the market needs to move away from this, but it's going to away longer process. >> kevin and mike will be with us for the rest of the hour. >> and it's time for the global markets report. kelly evans is standing by in london. i could string up a lot of thing to talk to you about, kelly. you're very close to davos. i don't know. we -- i don't really feel like i've missed anything, really. but you're still close. you could have jetted over there easily and joined in with, you know, john legend and charlie thero this e, andrew ross sorkin. >> i was hoping maybe s
is expected to vote this afternoon on a bill to suspend the debt ceiling for three months, following the house. this would allow more house for debate on the fiscal issues we're facing. the senate version includes several republican amendments, though, including matching spending cuts for every dollar increase in the debt ceiling. those amendments expected to be defeated. the bill won't technically raise the debt ceiling, but it will suspend it until may 19th when it will be raised by the amount that the treasury borrows in the interim. that's how it's going to work. and markets, as we've been talking about on a tear this month with the dow having its best january in decades. but will yesterday's surprising drop in gdp reign in the bulls, it says here? let's get a read on the state of the economy. at least it wasn't a -- that kind of rein. there's three of them. anyway, joining us for the next hour is bob bruska. that's fao -- >> no. you cannot. >> fao economics. as becky said at the top, things are going to go really well or the market is going to have an '87 crash. >> i like the binary outlo
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)